Creating Your Own Squeeze Page and Email List on WordPress

Creating Your Own Squeeze Page and Email List on WordPress

 

Ok so here’s the aha moment. My great friend Scott tells me, dude you got like 4 different email hosting sender list thinga-majigs and you should just add them to this wordpress app called MailPoet. I was busy at the time and then I remembered about it when I got hit with a $300 bill for blasting out to 12,000 emails in one month with YMLP (Your Mailing List Provider). So I exported all the lists I had in there using this process:

1) Login to your email provider
2) Go to Manage Contacts
3) Export the contacts into a CSV file (If they’re small lists you can merge them with others)
4) Then Install Mailpoet from the plugins area in your WordPress Blog (If you don’t have one, it’s super simple to setup, ask your hosting company). If you don’t have a hosting company check [this link out].

5) Mailpoet let’s you import up to 2000 leads. Once you pass that you’ll have to upgrade which I highly recommend doing.
6) Next Install Hybrid Connect. You may have to download the zip and install the plugin through your plugin link inside of WordPress. Grab the plugin here.

Any questions, comment below and I’ll be happy to help 🙂

Cesar

TGIF Legoland Day

Celebrating a week of working and playing hard with our online business with the #elitedropshippers. You deserve to fire your boss and enjoy life on your terms. #jobfree #sixfigure #lifestyle http://builddiamonds.com/djczer #tothetop

IceBucketChallenge

What The Heck is the ALS Ice Challenge?

What the Heck is This Ice Challenge About?

On Friday 8/22/2014, I was nominated by my friend and business partner JC Hernandez to do the ALS Ice Challenge. Before I did, I wanted to know more about it. What it did for others and what was the point of icing myself? At first I thought all these folks were crazy… I mean come on, the body changing temperature that fast can cause a serious illness I thought. As you will read below, I took the challenge because I knew it was for a good cause. Giving back is what it’s about. Enjoy. And then I did it….

From Alsa.org:

Just what is ALS?

Ice Bucket Challenge

ALS was first found in 1869 by French neurologist Jean-Martin Charcot, but it wasn’t until 1939 that Lou Gehrig brought national and international attention to the disease. Ending the career of one of the most beloved baseball players of all time, the disease is still most closely associated with his name. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord. Motor neurons reach from the brain to the spinal cord and from the spinal cord to the muscles throughout the body. The progressive degeneration of the motor neurons in ALS eventually leads to their death. When the motor neurons  die, the ability of the brain to initiate and control muscle movement is lost. With voluntary muscle action progressively affected, patients in the later stages of the disease may become totally paralyzed. When you have a lost loved one, it is best to visit wrongfuldeathcaselaw.com to learn more information.

What is ALS?

A-myo-trophic comes from the Greek language. “A” means no or negative. “Myo” refers to muscle, and “Trophic” means nourishment–”No muscle nourishment.” When a muscle has no nourishment, it “atrophies” or wastes away. “Lateral” identifies the areas in a person’s spinal cord where portions of the nerve cells that signal and control the muscles are located. As this area degenerates it leads to scarring or hardening (“sclerosis”) in the region.Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), often referred to as “Lou Gehrig’s Disease,” is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord. Motor neurons reach from the brain to the spinal cord and from the spinal cord to the muscles throughout the body. The progressive degeneration of the motor neurons in ALS eventually leads to their death. When the motor neurons die, the ability of the brain to initiate and control muscle movement is lost. With voluntary muscle action progressively affected, patients in the later stages of the disease may become totally paralyzed.   As motor neurons degenerate, they can no longer send impulses to the muscle fibers that normally result in muscle movement. Early symptoms of ALS often include increasing muscle weakness, especially involving the arms and legs, speech, swallowing or breathing. When muscles no longer receive the messages from the motor neurons that they require to function, the muscles begin to atrophy (become smaller). Limbs begin to look “thinner” as muscle tissue atrophies.

What Types of Nerves Make Your Body Work Properly?

(from Living with ALS, Manual 1: What’s It All About?) Nerves in ALSThe body has many kinds of nerves. There are those involved in the process of thinking, memory, and of detecting sensations (such as hot/cold, sharp/dull), and others for vision, hearing, and other bodily functions. The nerves that are affected when you have ALS are the motor neurons that provide voluntary movements andmuscle power. Examples of voluntary movements are your making the effort to reach for the phone or step off a curb; these actions are controlled by the muscles in the arms and legs. The heart and the digestive system are also made of muscle but a different kind, and their movements are not under voluntary control. When your heart beats or a meal is digested, it all happens automatically. Therefore, the heart and digestive system are not involved in ALS. Breathing also may seem to be involuntary. Remember, though, while you cannot stop your heart, you can hold your breath – so be aware that ALS may eventually have an impact on breathing. Although the cause of ALS is not completely understood, the recent years have brought a wealth of new scientific understanding regarding the physiology of this disease. While there is not a cure or treatment today that halts or reverses ALS, there is one FDA approved drug, riluzole, that modestly slows the progression of ALS as well as several other drugs in clinical trials that hold promise. Importantly, there are significant devices and therapies that can manage the symptoms of ALS that help people maintain as much independence as possible and prolong survival. It is important to remember that ALS is a quite variable disease; no two people will have the same journey or experiences.  There are medically documented cases of people in whom ALS ‘burns out,’ stops progressing or progresses at a very slow rate. No matter what your individual course or situation may be, The ALS Association and your medical team are here to help. To learn more about the personal stories of people who are living fully, click here. As one man put it, “I’ve made ALS part of my life, not my whole life.”

 

Make it a great day and thank you for sharing this post.

 

 

CesarRamirez.com

Cesar Ramirez

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cesar Ramirez

P.S. Other Folks that have accepted the challenge:


Other famous folks doing the challenge 🙂